sunset from behind the wire

sunset from behind the wire

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

White Wolf Mine Knife

A friend of mine who served with Third Special Forces (ODA3110) lives in the general region where the White Wolf Mine is located. He inspects the building site for me from time to time and keeps the trades honest. He asked me about a month ago whether or not I had a White Wolf Mine Knife. I told him that I own more than one knife but didn't have a dedicated knife to the place.

Today I received a knife that IS the official White Wolf Mine Knife, a one-off pattern welded blade that started off with nine layers of 1095 and 15N20 steel, folded to 288 layers. Hardened to Rockwell 60. It has a scrimshaw wolf on the grip. While it's significantly fancier than most of my blades, which were strictly designed for combat, it screams WHITE WOLF.



It's one of those blades that I'll bring out for ceremonial purposes like the thoracic cut on the first elk that is killed and cleaned on the property. Otherwise, it will enjoy a position of honor in my trophy/I love me area in the den.

CW Swanson (Daily Timewaster) suggested that I give it a name. What about Ulvens Tann (Wolf's Tooth - in Norwegian)?

         

35 comments:

  1. That is one beautiful knife, LL.

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  2. Sheer elegance. That is by far the most beautiful knife I have ever seen. Kudo's to the maker.

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  3. Now that is gorgeous! I like Damascene blades anyways. I think it is neat to see how the pattern comes out. And the scrimshaw on the handle is lovely. Definitely a knife to use and treasure!! You have great friends!!

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  4. An object worthy of envy.....

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  5. That is absolutely beautiful!

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  6. Everyone else has already said it... it's a beautiful knife. Good night.

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  7. Very gorgeous knife. We have taken to watching Forged in Fire, so I am familiar with Damascus patterns. You have a lovely one there.

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  8. Thank you all. I know, I've been a bit of a show off.

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  9. You had a post that mentioned art a few days ago. Now THAT is art!

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    1. To me, art is the apex of human achievement and there are many ways that it's expressed. To limit art to pigment or sculpture or literature is not a broad enough cast. Knives are a place where art and function meet (and you can throw in architecture and other mediums of art as well).

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  10. The more I think about it, great blades were often given names. Charlemagne's sword was called Joyeuse, for instance, and of course there is Excaliber. I always liked the penchant the Norse had for naming them things like Legbiter or Eaglefeeder.

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    1. If you look above, I'm now (on your good advice) suggesting the name Ulvens Tann - Wolf's Tooth - in Norwegian. Ok, it's not Eagle Feeder, but it's not a sword. It's a knife.

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    2. Wolf's Tooth goes better with White Wolf Mine than Eagle Feeder, too.

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    3. Yes but we do have bald eagles nesting on the lower property, and I'd like to use the knife to feed them just on general principles. But Wolf's Tooth will do.

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  11. A bit late to echo everyone, but that is gorgeous.

    There's a Richard Feynman quote about artists being egotistical; how they think their view of beauty is the only valid one. A bit long to paraphrase here.

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  12. Now THAT'S a nice looking knife! I've always liked the look of a Damascus blade and that one is a beauty. Enjoy.

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  13. But do you have a White Wolf virgin to sacrifice?

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    1. Maybe Odin will present something suitable for a sacrifice?

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  14. Nice runes and I don't know why but I'm thinking Fenrir Ulvens Tann at work in Unholyoak.

    Ragnarok.

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    1. Maybe the Valkyries will allow me into Valhalla if I die with it in my hand?

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  15. The name will bring luck to its owner. In due time I will bring you a bottle of traditional Norwegian water to the baptism of Ulvens Tann.

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  16. Very nice blade indeed. Both in design and materials. It's been my experience to keep those Damascus blades well oiled.

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    1. I have it oiled and tucked into two cotton socks.

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  17. Looks like something Conan would have had custom made by wizard kings!
    How big is it?
    Years ago I read a comment by some ancient Chinese, who was trading for Japanese swords. After going on and on about the various qualities of the blades, etc, he concluded "With such a sword, one may slay the barbarians!"

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    1. 15" overall. That's just about right. It's not a fighting knife. I have more than one of those and they have a different geometry. That said, some knives are for hard use and others are made for art....practical art, but art.

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  18. Beautiful knife. There is a fellow here that makes some almost as beautiful, and the balance is awesome. His don't have the white wolf on them though.

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    1. The white wolf is what sets it apart.

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  19. That is one very fine knife.
    I am having a damascus knife built, I hope mine is half as good looking as yours.
    Mine was ordered a couple of months ago, two more knives to be made before they start on mine.

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    1. Pattern welding is one of those things that I LOVE. The Damascene look is so absolutely attractive. I have a tanto style Damascus blade but frankly, I don't think that I've ever cut anything with it. The carry knives for me tend to default to folding knives.

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